Next meeting -

Wednesday 19th February

Buildings archaeologist Stuart Blaylock telling us about the magnificent restoration project undertaken at Greenham Barton west of Taunton. The aisled truss arcade post has just been dated to 1279/80. The great hall given enormous mullioned windows in the fifteenth century by the Bluetts of Cothay Manor and Holcombe Rogus, with lots of work confusing the issue since then.

New Pages added

Training page, in the "Surveys" menu.

Mailing list

Sign up for our mailing list and we will email you with reminders of our meetings.

Twitter We are now on Twitter

A brief history of SVBRG

pdf booklet download.

Drawing of a house

The Group

The Somerset Vernacular Building Research Group, SVBRG is a voluntary organisation founded in 1979 to record and study the traditional houses and buildings of the historic county of Somerset. Of particular interest are the smaller manor houses, farmhouses, cottages and barns which are in the local style and built of local materials.

Latest News

SVBRG 40th Birthday Party 2019

A special seminar to celebrate the 40th birthday of SVBRG, was held at Tintinhull Village Hall.
Dorothy Treasure of Wiltshire Buildings Record stepped forward as our keynote speaker.
There were also be short presentations by Alan Cort on “The declining cost of light through the ages”, Denny Robbins on “Taper marks in the Vernacular House – deliberate or accidental?” and John Rickard on “40 years of SVBRG”.
Refreshments will include a celebratory vernacular birthday cake, arguably the first of its kind. Cake

Made for us in Martock by The Silver Cake

The Vernacular Cash Point

Cash Point Located in a Victorian farm building on the outskirts of Martock, this neat hole in the wall is a "cash point". In living memory the farm workers would put their hand through the hole to collect their wages. Presumably identifying themselves at the same time.

Kingsbury cashpoint Kingsbury cash point A second instance has now been discovered, around 2 miles away, in Kingsbury Episcopi. This time in timber, and located in the wall of a small room, again dating from the Victorian period.